Book Review: Where the Crawdads Sing


For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life–until the unthinkable happens.

Perfect for fans of Barbara Kingsolver and Karen Russell, Where the Crawdads Sing is at once an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder. Owens reminds us that we are forever shaped by the children we once were, and that we are all subject to the beautiful and violent secrets that nature keeps.


This magnificent debut novel has captured the heart and soul of its readers while maintaining its rank as one of the bestselling novels of 2018. Written by Delia Owens, an American author, and zoologist,  “Where the Crawdads Sing” is a written declaration of how one woman’s’ desire for love and affection, from what appears a lifetime of solitude, brings about a tale of survival amidst prejudice and discrimination.

This is the story of Kya, abandoned by her parents and siblings at such a tender age with nothing but the marsh left to teach her how to survive and live her growing years.  Kya’s narrative is a picturesque tale of a lone white woman who had survived years living alone in a shack in the North Carolina marsh, her existence educated and nurtured by the natural world.  As Kya learns to deal with her loneliness, she finds herself longing to be with someone who would fill the gaps left by her own family. Just as mother nature offered her bosom to Kya, she, in turn, allowed herself to be drawn to two men enamored of her bewildering beauty.  Hopeful for the first time in years, Kya’s grip on normalcy ushered in another challenge–one that she was unable to face: a murder case charging her as the only viable suspect.

What made this novel utterly compelling is the way Owens applied her profession and knowledge of animals’ fundamental biological principles to human interaction. The symbiosis that marveled between humans and animals is remarkably described and portrayed. Mutualism and the adaptive collaboration between Kya and nature are the heart and soul of this novel.  

Owens’s debut novel is a work of art; a tour-de-force similar to the rave and success accomplished by “How to Kill a Mockingbird”.  This book tackled a nuance of themes ranging from prejudice, racism, abandonment, survival to love, murder trial, and forgiveness. The lush imagery and lyrical prose that Owens was able to craft interlaced with such a heartbreaking but inspiring plot are what impelled the readers to this book.  I don’t think there is anything left to say about this novel that has not yet been published. “Where the Crawdads Sing” combines imagery, poetry, and suspense interwoven into the fabric of social reality. Armed with multitudes of learning moments and valuable experiences, Kya’s narrative begs us to understand how human behavior acts independently of the values held by social hierarchies and cultures. A novel that is worth the wait and will be among the string of timeless classics: a wondrous tale, sad but beautiful; compelling yet insightful. 

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Author: Delia Owens

Genre: Literary Fiction / Coming of Age Fiction

Length: 384 pages

Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons; Later Printing edition (August 14, 2018)

ISBN-10: 0735219095

ISBN-13: 978-0735219090