Book Review: The Other Mrs.

She tried to run, but she can’t escape the other Mrs.

Sadie and Will Foust have only just moved their family from bustling Chicago to small-town Maine when their neighbor Morgan Baines is found dead in her home. The murder rocks their tiny coastal island, but no one is more shaken than Sadie.

But it’s not just Morgan’s death that has Sadie on edge. And as the eyes of suspicion turn toward the new family in town, Sadie is drawn deeper into the mystery of what really happened that dark and deadly night. But Sadie must be careful, for the more she discovers about Mrs. Baines, the more she begins to realize just how much she has to lose if the truth ever comes to light.

Kubica has created a well-researched narrative that explores multiple layers of mental illness which is quite a common trope in most thriller novels.  The fate of the characters in this nerve-wracking fictional work hangs on a balance and to be dealt with yet again the powerful tool of the unreliable narrator is enough to stay right till the end regardless of its almost predictable plot.

The most important theme of the novel concerns stigma and discrimination against mental illness.  People with mental illness are easily dismissed either as targets for public stigma and/or the stigma against the self.  The lesson to be learned from this work of fiction constitutes the 3A’s: awareness, acknowledgment, and action. Ignorance is not an excuse and apathy could dismiss any fundamental hopes of building confidence and healthy relationships and conditions. There is nothing more admirable than thrillers morphing into social novels that catalyze consciousness and elicit fury against injustices from people and society.  

What this novel presents, is real people dealing with real, oppressive problems. Kubica managed to represent characters battling against physical and mental health disorders and how self-centered, coercive, and manipulative people have taken advantage of their situation.  Bullying and abuse were also portrayed in this book and these socio-psychological problems are lethal seeds that grow into destructive ammunition later on in life.

Multiple timelines and multiple narrators, each with different perspectives and persuasions are the tools by which the author made use of to manipulate the readers.  The complexity of each of the characters–flawed and immanently human, yet vile and greedy–forms many archetypes common in fiction: “the villain”, “the victim”, “the rebel” and “the trickster”. But the element of surprise, judging by this book alone, is Kubica’s poison that kills whatever disappointment one reader may have of the plot’s predictability.  One might have misjudged the book early on but surprise, surprise, the narrative is not what you think it is. Just when you thought you already know the path the book is heading toward, the remarkable twist hits you right in the face. There seem to be no inhibitions on Kubica’s creative genius of a mind and to think that this novel is another suspenseful yet formulaic domestic thriller, will be in for a treat.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Author: Mary Kubica

Genre: Thriller / Mystery

Length: 368 pages

Publisher: Park Row; Original edition (February 18, 2020)

ISBN-10: 0778369110

ISBN-13: 978-0778369110

Book Review: The Wives

Thursday’s husband, Seth, has two other wives. She’s never met them, and she doesn’t know anything about them. She agreed to this unusual arrangement because she’s so crazy about him.

But one day, she finds something. Something that tells a very different—and horrifying—story about the man she married.

What follows is one of the most twisted, shocking thrillers you’ll ever read.

You’ll have to grab a copy to find out why.


It’s overwhelming how numerous domestic thriller novels have proliferated the book community over the course of the years.  With the increasing cases of domestic violence, divorce, and adultery, it’s no longer a surprise that female readers find themselves drawn to narratives that represent themselves within the context of marriage and relationships, abuse and the rightful justice they deserve.  The aphorism, “fiction as a reflection of reality” can never be truer than this case.

Tarry Fisher’s, “The Wives” presents an interesting premise about a wife who shares her husband with two other wives.  I have presumed the plot could go a hundred ways. From the outset, the novel started out strong, fast-paced, and unputdownable, emitting “The Girl on the Train” vibes.  But as the story progresses, I suddenly find myself navigating blindly, apparently lost in the story’s game of cat and mouse that the rising tension seems to fluctuate. I no longer felt the need to keep up with the plot and it didn’t help that I find the main character pathetically annoying and vulgar.  Whatever attempt at constructing an unreliable narrator to justify the plot, create a surprising plot twist, and to mislead the readers had been futile.

Overall, “The Wives” failed to grip me further on the basis of a seemingly forced plot with a lot of loose ends and loopholes.  There is not one character to root for. I felt the author was too focused on putting things into the story, meaning to progress in a specific way but the unlikely circumstances lack plausible and effective ways to create a somehow dependable thriller. 

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Author: Tarryn Fisher

Genre: Psychological Thriller / Domestic Thriller

Length: 336 pages

Publisher: Berkley; Graydon House; Original edition (December 30, 2019)

ISBN-10: 1525805126

ISBN-13: 978-1525805127